October 2022 Newsletter

We Need a Little More Queen

Article V News

Academy 3.0 Videos 

Who said it? 

We Need a Little More Queen 

By Vickie Deppe 

If you’re among the millions of Americans who watched documentaries about Queen Elizabeth in the wake of her passing, you’ve probably heard—more than once—about how gracious she was, eager to put everyone around her at ease. Presiding over the transformation of the British Empire into the British Commonwealth as well as the post-WWII eclipse of Great Britain by the United States, her demeanor facilitated diplomatic relations in some extremely delicate situations during her 71-year reign. The fifteen Prime Ministers—and even some US Presidents—who’ve served since she ascended the throne in 1952 have expressed appreciation for the safe space she created in which they were able to have frank, productive conversations. 

Many observers have opined that her role as head-of-state rather than head-of-government is what enabled Queen Elizabeth to exist in a sphere exclusively concerned with diplomacy and devoid of politics. Others, however, have noted her superior interpersonal facility as compared to her peers, perhaps the most dramatic example of which was her 2012 visit to Northern Ireland where she shook the hand of her cousin’s assassin, Martin McGuinness.  

But what does the late Queen of England have to do with Article V? Most Americans would agree that our public discourse has become toxic. DC insiders prefer this political acrimony because it means we’re too busy bickering amongst ourselves to hold them accountable for what they’re doing to us from Washington. If the states are going to successfully fulfill their responsibility to act as a check on the federal government, each of us—especially Republicans, who will likely have a comfortable majority at an upcoming convention—must abandon an adversarial mentality in favor of the gracious, healing posture the Queen displayed in even the most difficult of circumstances. 


 

Article V News 

Members of the Article V Coalition visited dozens of offices on Capitol Hill last month to drum up support for and HB 8419 and HCR 101, which require the Archivist to log, count, and notify Congress regarding Article V applications and provides for Congress to call a convention based on the 34 or more balanced budget amendment convention applications in force during the period from 1979-2019. David Biddulph, co-founder of the Let Us Vote for a Fiscal Responsibility Amendment Campaign notes “the parties are no longer divided on the need to reduce inflation. Even Speaker Pelosi has gone on record saying that reducing the deficit will help reduce inflation.” Additional information is available at https://letusvoteforfra.org. 

HCR 101 has also attracted more high-profile media coverage. The New York Times ran a somewhat lengthy hit piece in which a substantial amount of ink was given to former United States Senator Russ Feingold (D-WI). Feingold characterizes support for a convention as “crazy,” casting hyperbolic gloom-and-doom scenarios that ignore the Constitution’s stringent ratification requirements while erroneously contending that the process is a complete mystery. Having served in the Wisconsin legislature for a decade before his 18-year stint in the United States Senate, one would think he would be intimately familiar with the legislative rules, ad hoc committees, and interstate compacts that provide ample precedent for how the convention would operate. Feingold should also be cognizant of the fact that state legislators are no less competent than anyone roaming the halls of power in Washington, as most of them served in state government before arriving in Congress—just as he did.  

It is well that Sen. Feingold has left Congress, as his support for popular sovereignty and federalism are limited to his personal opinions regarding the agenda being advanced by We the People through our state legislators. Claiming to revere the founding generation and its belief in bloodless revolution even as he heads an organization that purports to guard against the concentration of power, Feingold ironically calls for a “serious national conversation” about revoking the states’ constitutional authority to impose reforms on Washington and entertaining “new ways to move forward with constitutional change,” not because of anything the states have done, but because he’s afraid of what they might do. Perhaps we should give our state legislators a chance before we pass judgement on them. 


 

Academy 3.0 Videos 

Did you miss the Academy in Denver? Were you there but would like to review the materials presented? Recordings are now available on the Path To Reform YouTube Channel.


 

 Who said it? 

When you start to humanize your enemy, you, in turn, may be dehumanized by your community. 

Cassie Jaye 

2017 

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